Warm water Tenkara fishing

Trip reports, findings, events, and general experiences with tenkara fishing. Tell other tenkara enthusiasts about your tenkara experience

Warm water Tenkara fishing

Postby rvrgzr » Thu Jul 23, 2009 10:09 pm

If you're not fishing warm water streams and ponds, you're missing some fun fishing with your Tenkara rod. These were all taken with my Yamame rod.

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Re: Warm water Tenkara fishing

Postby CM_Stewart » Fri Jul 24, 2009 4:11 am

Nice fish! Those are some serious 'gills. That foam spider looks like it would be deadly!

Most of my tenkara fishing has been in streams for trout, but I agree with you wholeheartedly that tenkara is not just for trout or just for streams. I haven't done that much warm water fishing with tenkara rods yet, and the fish I've caught have been quite a bit smaller than yours, but it's still a lot of fun.

I would say, though, that you have the right rod for it. I may be more cautious than necessary, but I think anyone fishing for either largemouth or smallmouth bass should definitely be fishing with a Yamame rather than the other rods. Bass aren't going to head for the next county, but they will definitely head for the nearest brushpile, and the Iwana or Ayu isn't going to stop them. The Ebisu might, but I'd still want to have the extra backbone the Yamame provides. In a way, it's a shame because the other rods would be great for bluegills. At least around here, though, where there are bluegills there are bass, and a big bass is just too much fish. I'm not even in bass country, but I've caught bass on spinning rods that would probably be too much for even the Yamame.

Tippet becomes an issue, too. I started out fishing with 6x, and kept getting broken off right on the hookset. I think the bass teeth were either cutting the tippet or at least nicking it so it would break with much less tension. I finally went to 4 lb test spinning line for a tippet. It has a breaking strength between 6x and 5x, but has the diameter of 3x, so it can resist the nicking just a little bit longer. I've used 4 lb test on my spinning rod for years (okay, decades), and know that it works fine as long as I retie after every nice bass, and after three or four small ones. It won't work in really heavy cover, but you're not going to get a bass out of heavy cover with a tenkara rod, anyway. I think the bottom line is that tenkara may be the most fun way to fish, but its still not a big fish method.
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Re: Warm water Tenkara fishing

Postby rvrgzr » Fri Jul 24, 2009 5:54 am

CM, all the fish aren't that big, but still fun:

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The sponge spider with the nymph dropper is often effective for many species of fish. I've used the idea for everything from trout to bass.
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Re: Warm water Tenkara fishing

Postby rsetina » Tue Jul 28, 2009 9:41 pm

Warm water fish on a Tenkara rod. Who would have guessed? What length leader and tippet are you using?
Rick

テンカラ。小さなストリームのシンプルさ。
My Tenkara Rods:
13' Ayu, 12' Yamame, 11' with a conversion handle, and an Ito.

My Wife's Tenkara Rods:
12' Ebisu and 13.5' Amago, 12' Iwana with a conversion handle, and an Ito.
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Re: Warm water Tenkara fishing

Postby rvrgzr » Wed Jul 29, 2009 1:44 pm

Usually 6' of 5x is plenty long enough.
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Re: Warm water Tenkara fishing

Postby Jerry in SC » Fri Jul 31, 2009 5:46 pm

I'm thinking the Tenkara would be well suited for 'gills on the bed. That Green Sunfish is a pretty rascal.
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Re: Warm water Tenkara fishing

Postby sholgate » Sat Aug 01, 2009 1:35 pm

You are really making a strong case for me to drop the funds and get a rod and rig.
Steven Holgate
West Lawn, PA

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Re: Warm water Tenkara fishing

Postby mundele » Fri Aug 07, 2009 6:47 pm

Question for you... I'm interested in trying tenkara... I'd like to get a rod suitable for both mountain streams (brookies, small trout, etc) as well as warmwater stuff. Is there one that'd work for both, or should I get the IWANA rod for mountain stuff, and something else for warm water?
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Re: Warm water Tenkara fishing

Postby Daniel @ Tenkara USA » Fri Aug 07, 2009 11:05 pm

Hi Mundele,
Maybe a biased comment (I'm the company's founder). But, all rods we carry, including the heavier Yamame rod, will be fine for small streams, they are all tenkara rods and stay true to the small stream tenkara tradition. With that being said, they are all different enough (with the exception of the Ayu and Ebisu which are relatively similar in feel) that sensations and experiences will be different and may warrant owning two different ones. I'd honestly say that owning an Yamame and an Iwana will enhance the experience when fishing the different waters. The Yamame has more backbone to it, the Iwana has more flex and less weight and will bend more when catching the small brookies. Maybe start with the Yamame, and once you feel comfortable with tenkara, go for the Iwana for the smaller streams. I'll let others weigh in though....
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Re: Warm water Tenkara fishing

Postby rvrgzr » Sat Aug 08, 2009 12:50 pm

dwgalhardo wrote:Hi Mundele,
Maybe a biased comment (I'm the company's founder). But, all rods we carry, including the heavier Yamame rod, will be fine for small streams, they are all tenkara rods and stay true to the small stream tenkara tradition. With that being said, they are all different enough (with the exception of the Ayu and Ebisu which are relatively similar in feel) that sensations and experiences will be different and may warrant owning two different ones. I'd honestly say that owning an Yamame and an Iwana will enhance the experience when fishing the different waters. The Yamame has more backbone to it, the Iwana has more flex and less weight and will bend more when catching the small brookies. Maybe start with the Yamame, and once you feel comfortable with tenkara, go for the Iwana for the smaller streams. I'll let others weigh in though....


As the company's founder, I hope you're biased! :!:

Good advice. The Yamame is so light and well balanced that I'm pleasantly surprised whenever I pick mine up. And the strength of the rod is amazing. I've carried it on a few hikes through pretty rough country. I have not used the lighter rods, but they must be a joy. And the lighter rods would make the small wild brookies lots of fun to catch.
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