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Dry or wet

PostPosted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 8:59 pm
by eagles
I read the experiment that was done where it was noted the trout spit out the dry fly so fast it was allmost impossible for an angler to set the hook , at least that was the conclusion of this test . However since most of my fishing has been with dry flies , and I hook my share of them this does not seem to be the case in reality . I wonder if the sparce hackels of the Tenkara flies causes the fish to feel the metal faster and so spit it out ? Many tests have shown in fact trout often take the fly down a ways before spitting it out and some anglers, mysef included have tried to set the hook on a dry to fast , and lost the fish like that .SO, why not fish dry flies with Tenkara rods ? I dont see how I will stop being able to hook them when I change to a Tenkara Rod ? Some times also using more of a foam type beetle will keep it in the trouts mouth longer .

Re: Dry or wet

PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 5:55 am
by Morgan
Tenkara rods are GREAT for dry flies. Same advantages as wets and nymphs -- a great drift because little or no line is lying on the water and the ability to reach spots a 9-foot fly rod can't. TenkaraUSA usually carries flies that are classified as dries, and regular western-style Catskill, parachute, comparadun flies work great too.

Re: Dry or wet

PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 6:13 am
by goneflyfishing
who says you can't fish dries with a tenkara rod, silly? tenkara is perfect for dries!

Re: Dry or wet

PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 6:36 am
by eagles
In reading about Tenkara the informations suggests the traditional flies are a cross between dry and wet and because they are sparsley tied sink a bit below the surface ,and that was superior to a egular dry fly . I also stated the given experiment cited that suggests by the Japanese Tenkara experimentor that fisherman were not fast enough to set the hook on a dry fly based on the time he found it took for a reaction of the fisherman compared with the reaction of the fisth to spit it out . All of this suggests fishing a dry flt is not the best Idea with Tenkara . I beielve all of this is on this web site in various places so I wondered about it as I agre, IT IS SILLY . I dd not nor do see any reason not to fish dry flies with Tenkara .

Re: Dry or wet

PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 6:47 am
by CreationBear
I might be a little eccentric, but I fish dries exclusively on my Western rod and only softhackles with my Ayu. It's not that a Tenkara rod doesn't handle dries well, but that it's superlative with flies in the "film." (And on a not-unrelated-note, I find I'm much more civilized with my hooksets when I'm fishing wet flies--after all these years, I still get the yips when a big brown blows up on a dry, so my line/leader is apt to wind up in the trees if I get too burly. :lol: )

Re: Dry or wet

PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 7:47 am
by wrknapp
One can fish ANY fly with a tenkara rod and do well. The advantage of the traditional flies is that the length of the rod allows one to manipulate the fly to either drift wet or dry and make the fly act like an emerger also. Because the line to fly is usually tighter, it is also easier to set the hook quicker and thus avoid the fly being spit out. It is still important to watch the take and set the hook after the fish "turns" on it. However, I have still pulled the fly out of the fishes mouth in haste.

Randy

Re: Dry or wet

PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 8:14 am
by eagles
Thanks . I htink the rod will be great for drys as well . I will stick to drys for now , when I can , that "excitment of the rise " is what I fish for anyway. By they way everytime I reply I have to sign in again . is their a" keep me signed in "feature here ?

Re: Dry or wet

PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 10:22 am
by Daniel @ Tenkara USA
We have all fished dries and caught plenty of fish. The research cited talks one of the studies in which the average time a trout holds a fly in its mouth, when taken on the surface, being 0.2 seconds, and the shortest reaction time for an angler to react to the sight of fish being 0.3 seconds. So, in theory the majority of fish would be lost. Of course, the study was conducted with hookless flies, and in many cases the fish will hook itself as soon as it tries to spit a hook out of its mouth. This has nothing to do with the sparseness of a tenkara fly v. a buggy fly, the fish will spit anything out that doesn't feel right. So, Dr. Ishigaki figured, if we can not reduce the reaction time of an angler, how can we increase the amount of time a trout holds the fly in its mouth, he decided to see what would happen if a fly is under the film, and that increased the time to 0.6 seconds. The difference is probably due to the extra "tension" a fly on the surface may have and the fish will feel.

Dry flies will work on tenkara. The fish will spit a fly out (or try to) no matter whether it's done with tenkara or western gear. The wet flies may have a slight advantage.

Also, it's important to note that a tenkara fly can also be fished on the surface, either by ensuring it's dry, or by purposefully dragging it on the surface. And, many fish will be caught this way. Dragging it on the surface may be one of my favorite ways to fish a tenkara fly, as I still enjoy them taking it on the surface. But, if they don't I can switch my technique to fishing it deeper without switching flies.

Re: Dry or wet

PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 10:42 am
by eagles
Yes that is it . I have also found , soft flies like foam beetles are held in the mouth much longer as they must feel more real . can you explain "draging the fly acros the water " As it lands are you twitching it , or moving the rod sidways with a tight line so it sort of dances on the surface ? If so is this for a tiny amount like ,it just barley skids , or have you found it better to make it skid for five or six inches as if it is trying to escape despertlay etc ? Sounds very interesting .