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Re: saltwater tenkara

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:58 am
by jeffkreager
Wow! Saltwater Tenkara. I will assume the 32 feet of leader and tippet would be tough to cast with a steady head win.

Re: saltwater tenkara

PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2009 10:30 am
by Cross Creek
Euell Gibbons (author of "Stalking the Wild Asparagus" and other books on wild food gathering and preparation) used to fish in salt water with a long cane pole, line, hook, and bait he gathered at the shore. I'm sure many native island fishermen world wide have use similar tackle with great success--sounds like fun, and no reels to need special anti-corrosion care.
-CC

Re: saltwater tenkara

PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2009 12:55 pm
by rvrgzr
Cross Creek wrote:Euell Gibbons (author of "Stalking the Wild Asparagus" and other books on wild food gathering and preparation) used to fish in salt water with a long cane pole, line, hook, and bait he gathered at the shore. I'm sure many native island fishermen world wide have use similar tackle with great success--sounds like fun, and no reels to need special anti-corrosion care.
-CC


"Euell" RiverGeezer (author of "Swamp Drifter" and other scribblings) used to fish salt water with a long cane pole, line, hook, and sand fleas (mole crabs) he gathered at the shore. Pompano, sand perch, whiting, et al., are often in the surf break--at least in south Florida. Under certain conditions: fairly calm surf and before the tide changes, you could use a Yamame successfully. I wouldn't recommend doing that when bluefish or jack crevalle are in the surf, however.

Note: Targeting the species below with the Tenkara equipment presently available, is not recommended. But can you imagine how much fun it would be? Especially that ladyfish.

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Re: saltwater tenkara

PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2009 8:52 am
by tonywee
Yoohoo, my Iwana was delivered today. It took 15 days to arrive from USA on a direct order made possible by Daniel. Another earlier order for a Yamame is still stuck in London, enroute to Malaysia. You see, I live in Port Klang, Malaysia and it took some doing to get into Tenkara.

Anyways, I immediately took it out for a "spin" at the marina near some mangroves.....and in a steady drizzle, caught 3 small Archer Fish and lost another2 using 4 lb. tippet and a size 14 black ant fly in the space of an hour. :D Will take it out to a few hill streams next week for some local fresh water fishes.

Casting with the Tenkara line was easy. The setup allows one to easily control the fly. In this case, you have to either skip the fly or dap it near the archer fish to get its attention. Once interested, it'll spit a stream of water at it and then rush to attack it like a fallen insect.... but not as easy as it sounds, since you need to be stealthy 'cause with its eyes angled up looking for insects in the mangroves, it can easily see you and its gone in a sec.

Re: saltwater tenkara

PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2009 7:31 am
by chtyrr
tonywee

That sounds like fun!

Re: saltwater tenkara

PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2009 5:48 am
by Adam Trahan
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It appears that Tenkara like rods and techniques have been used in the sea a lot longer than Tenkarausa.com has been around.

I hardly doubt this is the first black man to fish a bamboo tenkara rod in the salt. This picture is a couple of years ago and is on an island off the coast of South Africa.

Re: saltwater tenkara

PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2010 9:36 pm
by rsetina
Heading to the surf tomorrow and I may give the Yamame a try for some perch. We've been fishing for leopard sharks and the sand crabs are starting to show up so a crab pattern or a shrimp pattern may yield up a few perch. Oh, heres the leopard I caught last Friday. Don't want to hook one of these on the Yamame so I'll keep the line short. :lol:

I'll let you know if I get any on the Tenkara rod. Sure would be fun. Perch that is! No he's not eating my arm.

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