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Momentary Connections and setting the hook

PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 3:43 pm
by davebanker
Took the Yamame 5:5 out for a Euro-nymphing trip this past week. It was very productive and I really appreciated the ability to reach over the faster water and pin-point likely holds in the seam. I ended up switching over to dries for the walk down stream to the car. One thing I have noticed is that it seems like I am having more "momentary connections," where I have the fish on for about two or three shakes and then the fish is off. Has anyone else noticed this or I am reading into this? Also, on the dry fly takes it seems like I'm only hooking about 25% of the takes. I will definitely sharpen my hooks but I'm wondering if there's a different method to setting the hook with such a sensitive tip? Thanks.

Re: Momentary Connections and setting the hook

PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:15 pm
by CM_Stewart
I have noticed the missed takes or momentary hook-ups when using the softer rods (Iwana and Ayu) for Euro-nymphing but not so much with the Yamame. I suspect it does take getting used to the soft tip of the tenkara rods, but you should get used to it soon. Perhaps a bit more aggressive hook set is called for.

Re: Momentary Connections and setting the hook

PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 7:46 pm
by rsetina
I read another post here where it took a while to get use to setting the hook. Keep at it and you'll get the hang of it.

Re: Momentary Connections and setting the hook

PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 7:46 pm
by rsetina
I read another post here where it took a while to get use to setting the hook. Keep at it and you'll get the hang of it.

Re: Momentary Connections and setting the hook

PostPosted: Sat Aug 29, 2009 7:47 pm
by LMarshall
CM_Stewart wrote:I have noticed the missed takes or momentary hook-ups when using the softer rods (Iwana and Ayu) for Euro-nymphing but not so much with the Yamame. I suspect it does take getting used to the soft tip of the tenkara rods, but you should get used to it soon. Perhaps a bit more aggressive hook set is called for.


I noticed this today as well. I took my Iwana out to the local lake this morning since it was damn cold and pouring rain, and I didn't feel like putting a lot of effort into fishing. I Figured I'd just try and catch a few pumpkinseeds or bluegill off the docks. After catching a few on poppers I switched to a weighted woolly bugger, and definitely missed a few takes when I failed to get the hook set. The tip is so soft it will bend against the resistance from taking up any slack line in the water, before any of that energy gets transferred to the hook set.

I found that I had to keep the fly moving and the line tight by twitching the rod, and make a fairly concerted hook set. I don't feel like I missed that many strikes, and found the woolly bugger to be more productive than poppers or smaller nymphs.

Re: Momentary Connections and setting the hook

PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2009 5:41 pm
by Jerry in SC
I fished the Chattooga River today. It's more open than most of our smaller streams, I didn't even get in the water. The water was low, but the fish were feeding. This is a high traffic stream with easy access.

I took a few rainbows on dries today...no misses. Several on a #16 Pheasant Tail out of one tiny run. One fish of about 12" gave me all I wanted on the Iwana....shot out of the water like a salmon. I noticed myself sweeping the rod a little more than usual so that might have been why I had good hook-ups.

One guy came by to ask what fly I was using, made no mention of my rather odd looking rod.

I guess he figured I was too poor for a proper rod & reel and didn't want to embarass me :lol:

Had fun regardless.....

Re: Momentary Connections and setting the hook

PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2009 6:23 pm
by LMarshall
Jerry in SC wrote:I fished the Chattooga River today. It's more open than most of our smaller streams, I didn't even get in the water. The water was low, but the fish were feeding. This is a high traffic stream with easy access.

I took a few rainbows on dries today...no misses. Several on a #16 Pheasant Tail out of one tiny run. One fish of about 12" gave me all I wanted on the Iwana....shot out of the water like a salmon. I noticed myself sweeping the rod a little more than usual so that might have been why I had good hook-ups.

One guy came by to ask what fly I was using, made no mention of my rather odd looking rod.

I guess he figured I was too poor for a proper rod & reel and didn't want to embarass me :lol:

Had fun regardless.....


My Iwana has been great at setting the hook on dries as well, no problems there! The first time I went out to a small stream I hooked an 8 inch brookie, that fish really fought. Quite a blast on a rod this light.

The only time I had problems with the hook set was fishing the woolybugger deep, with most of my line in the water. I think the drag from a little slack line in the water was the problem. I wonder if a level line would be better for this kind of fishing? I dont think tenkara was ever really meant to be used for fishing nymphs and streamers that deep anyway.

Re: Momentary Connections and setting the hook

PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:04 pm
by CM_Stewart
LMarshall wrote:I wonder if a level line would be better for this kind of fishing? I dont think tenkara was ever really meant to be used for fishing nymphs and streamers that deep anyway.


Level line would not be much better. A light level line will have a little less resistance to the water, but only a little. In any event, ideally only your 5x or 6x tippet is in the water anyway. With a light level line, (10# test fluorocarbon spinning line - roughly equivalent to 0x) I have caught fish with my 11' Iwana on lightly weighted nymphs, but really started to miss strikes when I went to a heavier nymph that fished deeper.

You are correct that tenkara was not meant for fishing that deep. Almost everything I've read on the Japanese websites suggests fishing within a few inches of the surface, with only a bit of tippet in the water and with a fairly tight line. Then getting a hookset is easy (well, easier).

Re: Momentary Connections and setting the hook

PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2009 9:36 pm
by spike188
I've definately noticed more long distance releases with my Iwana rod. I'll frequently hook up for a moment or two and then lose the fish. But I think I'm also hooking more fish to begin with which makes up for it. I've seen a couple of posts who suggest not trying to to set the hook on a take; just let the fish take it. I'm fishing for small trout with dry flys mainly. Really enjoying this rod. I feel like I'm much more focused on my presentation and even my approach to the prime lies. I tend to stalk the fish more than relying on just standing and casting.

Re: Momentary Connections and setting the hook

PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2009 9:28 pm
by davebanker
Thanks for the responses. Spike, I'm in Chico as well and we might well be fishing the same creeks/rivers. These poles are perfect for the small, wild creek fish. I suspect that because my drifts are better, I'm getting more strikes as well. Not sure I'm converting as high I would expect though. Oh, and I made a mistake, the rod is the Iwana. I do notice that I tend to really scope out where the lies are before just blindly start casting.